Friday, January 24, 2020

News / DT 19-20 / 2015

Reach of Nordic aid diminishes in 2016

 
Through the fall Nordic politicians swung the axe at their development budgets, using aid to fill in gaps in public financing at home. The dramatic shake up of Nordic aid is not only a result of the refugee crisis. Development Today’s analysis presents the final budget figures from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.
Read more >>
 
 

Norad’s new boss: aid agency as investment advisor

 
Future aid will be more about advice and exchange of experience and less about money, says Jon Lomøy in an interview with Development Today. 
Read more >>

Global Fund plays hardball on corruption

 
In an effort to clear a backlog of millions of dollars in misused grants, the Global Fund has introduced a tough new measure that punishes countries for failing to reimburse money owed.
Read more >>

Finland holds Presidency of Nordic Council in 2016

 
Finland will hold the Presidency of the Nordic Council of Ministers during 2016 with Anne Berner serving as Finland’s Nordic Minister.
Read more >>

More modest fund-raising goal for 2017-2019

 
The Global Fund, which aims to eradicate AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria as epidemics, has announced that it is aiming to raise USD 13 billion in financing for its 2017-2019 funding period.
Read more >>

Three rounds of cuts in Copenhagen

 
In two rounds of cuts during the fall, the Danish government slashed the aid budgets for 2015 and 2016 by a total of DKK 5.85 billion (EUR 770m). On top of this, another DKK 1.5 billion was taken out of the 2016 aid budget to cover domestic refugee costs. 
Read more >>

Austerity triggers drastic Finnish cuts

 
Finland, which faces the most severe economic set-back among the Nordics, made a dramatic roll-back of development assistance for 2016 as part of an austerity move. Domestic refugee costs are, however, not drawn from the aid budget.
Read more >>

Stricter asylum policy may diminish aid cuts

 
With 160,000 people seeking asylum in Sweden during 2015, the aid budget came under extreme pressure. In the end, the government placed a 30 per cent ceiling on aid funds that can be spent on domestic refugee costs. More cuts are likely to be announced in the spring, but a stricter asylum policy could mean fewer arrivals.
Read more >>

Cuts rolled back by dipping into Oil Fund

 
An initial proposal to take NOK 7.3 billion out of the Norwegian aid budget for 2016 to financed refugee costs at home was thwarted by an intense lobbying campaign. A compromise was struck where 20 per cent of the aid budget will finance refugees, and extra resources will be provided by the Oil Fund.
Read more >>